About

The Green Ribbon is an off-road tour of around 1,300 km from the southern Swedish mountains to the northern point at Treriksroset where Sweden, Finland and Norway meet, or vice versa. Back in 2015 I attempted to ride this as part of a longer off-road journey from Hjo in the south of Sweden to Treriksroset, the point where Sweden, Norway and Finland meet. The accompanying blog never got finished unfortunately. Upon my return daily life got in the way of quality time at the key board. In summary, I made it all the way to Staloluokto in Padjelanta National Park where my journey was terminated. Apparently, cycling is not allowed there and I was sternly informed that the only way out would be by helicopter (!!!) as walking with my bike to the park’s boundary was also a no go. A bit of a bummer after riding 2000km, but alas, an expensive lesson learnt.

I’ll give it another try in August-September 2020. This time starting either in Abisko or Treriksroset, depending on the Norwegian quarantine requirements in August, terminating the journey about a month later I hope in Grovelsjon. I obviously won’t be moving through Padjelanta this time, but will stick to the Kungsleden at those lattitudes.

In this blog I will (try to) detail the preparation and ride itself.

The bike of choice is my 11ANTS elephANT, a fat bike that rolls on 4.0″ tires. The idea is to ride self-supported and re-supply every 6-10 days. The expected average daily distance is around 50km, giving me a total of around 30 days in which to complete the trip. Wish me luck!

 

4 thoughts on “About

  1. Hello Michiel,
    I came across this post on my research how to continue from Sylarna to Kiruna bikepacking on my Plus Bike (3″ tires). Reading that you actually completed most of the route I am very interested in information and/or GPX tracks where you did cycle and how the conditions were.
    I am not doing the “green ribbon” though, I am on a longer journey through northern Europe. But it might be a good way to go north in the most impressive landscapes 🙂

    Feel free to contact me by mail or instagram @themonkeyrides !

    Wish you good luck for your challange,
    David

    Like

    • Hi David, judging by the pics on your Instagram you know what you are getting yourself into 😀 Conditions vary greatly, there’s some awesome riding along the way but also plenty of walking/pushing/lifting.

      Happy to share some gpx files, I’ll drop you a line through your website.

      Like

  2. Hi Michiel
    Good luck this time.
    I hope you are aware that even the Kungsleden is not a option all the way, as it passes through Stora-Sjöfallet and even Sarek which have the same regulations according bikes as Padjelanta.
    https://laponia.nu/en/contact/frequent-asked-questions/

    Click to access Foreskrifter-nationalparker-Laponia_nfs-2013-10.pdf


    If you ride towards Hukejaure-Sitasjaure-Ritsem from Sälka you can pass Stora Sjöfallet.
    To avoid Sarek between Aktse and Kvikkjokk take the trail towards Cykelstigen 😉 and down to Tjåmotis and on to Kvikkjokk.
    Further south I have no knowledge about bike-restrictions.

    Have fun
    Henning

    Like

    • Thanks for your insights Henning, looks like a good alternative. I wasn’t aware of the limitations in Stora-Sjofallet. Reading the regulations, I think walking the Stora-Sjofallet and Sarek sections with the bike in hand should be allowed. The rules explicitly mention “cykla” as not being allowed but doesn’t say anything about walking next to the bike. I’ll bring a copy of the regulations with me and see how that loophole goes down 🙂

      Like

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